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Electrolytic Printing Without Using a Wetting Mechanism

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050823D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bernier, WE: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Known electrolytic or electrochemical printing techniques currently require the use of a moisturizing roller mechanism to dissolve salts on the surface of pretreated paper and provide a low resistance which, in turn, may generate the print marks. Printing has been achieved, as reported in numerous patents in the prior art, without providing wetting; however, the voltage required is very high, i.e., on the order of greater than or equal to 100 volts, compared to less than or equal to 25 volts in the case of electrolytic chemical printing. The convenience of printing without a wetting mechanism is advantageous and provides increased reliability, minimized periodic maintenance, and reduced chances for corrosion of the internal printing mechanism and paper path components.

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Electrolytic Printing Without Using a Wetting Mechanism

Known electrolytic or electrochemical printing techniques currently require the use of a moisturizing roller mechanism to dissolve salts on the surface of pretreated paper and provide a low resistance which, in turn, may generate the print marks. Printing has been achieved, as reported in numerous patents in the prior art, without providing wetting; however, the voltage required is very high,
i.e., on the order of greater than or equal to 100 volts, compared to less than or equal to 25 volts in the case of electrolytic chemical printing. The convenience of printing without a wetting mechanism is advantageous and provides increased reliability, minimized periodic maintenance, and reduced chances for corrosion of the internal printing mechanism and paper path components.

The figure depicts a method of carefully controlling the equilibrium humidity level of the paper supply, immediately prior to printing. At room temperature, approximately 20 degrees C, it has been demonstrated that printing can be achieved if the relative humidity is maintained at greater than or equal to 58.3%. Optimally, the relative humidity should be maintained at greater than or equal to 70%. Paper equilibrated at these humidity levels absorbs adequate moisture to allow printing at the low voltage and current levels characteristic of this type of printing. This humidity control concept requires certain packaging requirements and print hea...