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Time Distribution Generator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050943D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hadsell, RW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Distribution generators have long been used in hardware monitors to generate frequency distributions of instructions or address maps. Using a counter and an interval timer to preprocess signals, a distribution generator can also produce a time distribution of a signal, i.e., a distribution of how many times a signal occurs in certain intervals from a designated starting instant.

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Time Distribution Generator

Distribution generators have long been used in hardware monitors to generate frequency distributions of instructions or address maps. Using a counter and an interval timer to preprocess signals, a distribution generator can also produce a time distribution of a signal, i.e., a distribution of how many times a signal occurs in certain intervals from a designated starting instant.

A distribution generator counts how often each of all possible simultaneous bit patterns occurs in a stream of n signals. A distribution generator usually consists of a memory with 2 cells and an adder. For initialization, all cells are set to zero. Then, the adder interprets each incoming bit pattern as an address and increments the contents of the corresponding cell by one. At the end, each cell holds a count of how many times the bit pattern corresponding to its address has occurred in the input stream.

The time distribution generator provides a different form of input to a distribution generator as described above. It consists of an interval timer, which specifies the width of the time slots of the distribution, and a counter that holds the number of intervals that have elapsed from the start of the distribution to the current interval. The counter has the same width n as the input to the distribution generator. This configuration, shown in Fig. 1, can generate a time distribution of a signal over 2/n/ time intervals.

An external start signal resets the interval counter and starts the interval timer. The interval signal from the interval timer increments the interval counter. The data signal gates the current contents of the interval c...