Browse Prior Art Database

Protection System for a Liquid Cooled Computer System Using a Shell and Tube Heat Exchanger

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050971D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Torino, AL: AUTHOR

Abstract

Liquid (water)-cooled computer systems using a shell and tube-type heat exchanger generally have the water flowing through the shell side and building chilled water flowing through the tube side. In the event of leakage from the tube to shell side (as a result of corrosion, erosion, etc.), the system side expansion tank will overflow. Overflowing presents two major problems: 1. An irate customer as a result of continuous water flowing within the computer installation before corrective action is taken. 2. Building water entering the liquid-cooled computer hardware. The system water quality is orders of magnitude better than building water; hence, system interior coolant passages will require cleaning and flushing.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 61% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Protection System for a Liquid Cooled Computer System Using a Shell and Tube Heat Exchanger

Liquid (water)-cooled computer systems using a shell and tube-type heat exchanger generally have the water flowing through the shell side and building chilled water flowing through the tube side.

In the event of leakage from the tube to shell side (as a result of corrosion, erosion, etc.), the system side expansion tank will overflow. Overflowing presents two major problems: 1. An irate customer as a result of continuous water flowing within the computer installation before corrective action is

taken. 2. Building water entering the liquid-cooled computer hardware. The system water quality is orders of magnitude better than

building water; hence, system interior coolant passages will

require cleaning and flushing.

Although there are many protection sensors and schemes to indicate this occurrence, the disclosure set forth here achieves the indicated results without the need of additional hardware.

The figure shows a simplified schematic diagram of a computer CDU (Coolant, Distribution Unit). Two pumps 10 and 12 are used, one running, the other standby, and they are alternated periodically. There is a non-normal case where the two pumps may be running simultaneously for a short duration, but this cannot be considered since it is not a normal operating condition. The scheme works as follows:

A drip pan 14 is installed beneath each pump to accumulate drippings in the event of a...