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Stack Overflow Indication

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050987D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Martin, JS: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article deals with the situation in a microprocessor, for example, the Intel 8085, in which a stack can overflow the memory space provided to contain it. The architecture of such a microprocessor provides a hardware stack which grows toward lower memory addresses, with no provision for a stack length or end of stack indication.

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Stack Overflow Indication

This article deals with the situation in a microprocessor, for example, the Intel 8085, in which a stack can overflow the memory space provided to contain it. The architecture of such a microprocessor provides a hardware stack which grows toward lower memory addresses, with no provision for a stack length or end of stack indication.

However, in a machine whose memory consists of both read-only storage and random-access memory, and whose architecture further provides for a trap interrupt on any attempt to store information in the read-only storage, one can position the stack in the memory such that it ends at the read-only and random- access interface. In this manner, as the stack overflows, an attempt will be made to write the lowest address data into the read-only storage, thereby causing the trap interrupt. The trap interrupt then indicates a stack overflow.

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