Browse Prior Art Database

Read EC Command

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000050989D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Heath, CA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In the present technological environment it is not uncommon for field replaceable parts of a digital data processing system to evolve through plural levels of engineering change (EC), each level requiring a different diagnostic procedure during maintenance testing. Consequently, it becomes necessary to ensure that maintenance personnel can identify the EC level of each part of the system before attempting to test and possibly replace any parts.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Read EC Command

In the present technological environment it is not uncommon for field replaceable parts of a digital data processing system to evolve through plural levels of engineering change (EC), each level requiring a different diagnostic procedure during maintenance testing. Consequently, it becomes necessary to ensure that maintenance personnel can identify the EC level of each part of the system before attempting to test and possibly replace any parts.

This article concerns a scheme for making such EC level information available to maintenance personnel in an automatic manner. A processor communicating with such personnel (e.g., through a maintenance console) is programmed to address "READ EC" commands to each part requiring BC level identification. In response, control circuits on or associated with the addressed parts present data expressions to the interrogating processor representing the EC levels of respective parts.

Typically, or desirably, each such level identification expression should contain two bytes (or terms), one for indicating the EC level of changes made to the hardware of the associated part and the other for indicating the level of changes made to microcode or firmware associated with the part (e.g., as a result of replacements of read-only storage modules or alterations of reloadable modules). Values of these bytes may be arranged to indicate the sequence number of the most recent change. That is, before any changes have been made, bot...