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Browse Prior Art Database

Photoconductor Belt

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051006D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Berquist, KZ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A length of xerographic photoconductor web is formed into a continuous belt by the use of reinforcing material and heat welding techniques.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 80% of the total text.

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Photoconductor Belt

A length of xerographic photoconductor web is formed into a continuous belt by the use of reinforcing material and heat welding techniques.

The figure shows the two ends 10 and 11 of a photoconductor web which are to be butt-welded. Layer 12 is the photoconductor layer, whereas layer 13 is the photoconductor's polyester film support layer. This web may be an exemplary 18 inches wide and 0.003 inch thick. This process may be demonstrated with a 70 mm wide piece of photoconductor, since this size fits a commercially available PRESTO-SPLICER Trademark of Prestoseal Manufacturing Corporation.

A narrow strip of 0.0005 inch thick polyester 14 is placed on the lower side of the butt, as shown.

Reference numerals 16 and 17 represent the heater block and the spring- loaded TEFLON Trademark of E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. block, respectively, of the splicer. The splicer's heat control (i.e., ammeter) is set to about 15 amperes, and its time control is set to about two seconds.

Block 17 is now lowered to produce a pressure of about 4 to 5 psi. The splicer's start button is then actuated. The spliced material is then removed from the splicer, turned over, and replaced in the splicer with a second strip of polyester 14. The splicer is closed, and the start button is again actuated. This process can be accomplished without this second splicing step if block 17 is replaced with a spring-loaded heater block similar to block 16. In this case, the two polyeste...