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Browse Prior Art Database

Electrolytic Thermal Print Head

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051021D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chai, HD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Electrolytic or electrochemical printing has the potential of yielding high quality printing at higher densities than is possible with other types of conventional printing systems. It is, however, possible to enhance this performance and print quality by raising the temperature of leuco dyes used in these technologies to approximately 60 degrees F prior to printing.

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Electrolytic Thermal Print Head

Electrolytic or electrochemical printing has the potential of yielding high quality printing at higher densities than is possible with other types of conventional printing systems. It is, however, possible to enhance this performance and print quality by raising the temperature of leuco dyes used in these technologies to approximately 60 degrees F prior to printing.

Such pre-heat bias has been accomplished through the use of a standard thermal print head in a conventional arrangement, such as is depicted in Fig. 1a. Fig. 1b illustrates the use of a standard thermal print head in an arrangement suitable for electrochemical printing. The typical resistance of available thermal print heads ranges from 100 to 500 ohms at 100-pel (picture element) printing densities.

The approaches shown in Figs. 1b, 2, 3, 4 and 5 depict several arrangements for utilizing standard print heads in the above-noted technologies. They can be summarized as follows: a) Approach I (Fig. 1b) shows a heater element per electrode

positioned immediately ahead of the write electrode;

b) Approach II (Fig. 2) depicts an arrangement wherein

individual thermal elements are used for each electrode with

provided grounds serving as the return path for the write

electrode and the thermal element associated therewith, the

ground following the write electrode;

c) Approach III (Fig. 3) illustrates a common thermal element,

integrated into the write head, for all electrodes;

d)...