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MLC Laser Sizing Laminate Handling

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051098D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 3 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chiaiese, VC: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A CO(2) circulating gas laser, rated at 1.2 kW, and continuously discharging infrared laser radiation at a wavelength of 10.6 Mum, is used to cut multilayer "unfired" ceramic substrates. The laser beam has a diameter of 0.0254 cm (0.010 in.) and is stationary. The laminate, mounted on a vacuum chuck assembly, is indexed under the laser beam. The required substrate tolerances can be designed for X, Y dimensions and for feature to edge centrality.

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MLC Laser Sizing Laminate Handling

A CO(2) circulating gas laser, rated at 1.2 kW, and continuously discharging infrared laser radiation at a wavelength of 10.6 Mum, is used to cut multilayer "unfired" ceramic substrates. The laser beam has a diameter of 0.0254 cm
(0.010 in.) and is stationary. The laminate, mounted on a vacuum chuck assembly, is indexed under the laser beam. The required substrate tolerances can be designed for X, Y dimensions and for feature to edge centrality.

Various laser-cutting techniques are available to provide high qualities of cut edge profile and surface texture that are comparable to flat, vertical, sawed or milled edges.

This system minimizes the time required to load, align and unload MLC (multilayer ceramic) green laminates.

In any high precision cutting operation, the time spent deciding where to cut represents a significant portion of the total cycle time. Any additional time above the actual cutting time is overhead that detracts from the usefulness of the tool. The cutting time for laser sizing is fixed by the beam energy density, laminate thickness, and the cut quality required. The overhead time associated with laser sizing has been reduced by eliminating all complex loading, aligning, and unloading operations formerly associated with the laser-sizing operation.

Illustrated is the work flow in the laser-sizing cycle. At the start of the sizing cycle the cutting table comes to the front of the tool and the vacuum chuck tilts up (Step 1), presenting itself for loading through an opening in the cutting cavity. Because of the inherent danger from the 10.6 Mum laser radiation, the cutting cavity is completely enclosed and the operator never has to reach inside. The operator need only remove the laminate from its storage tray and slide it onto the vacuum chuck. Three pins, integral to the vacuum chuck, rough align the substrate in the X, Y and 0 dimensions. The operator signals that the load is completed and vacuum is drawn. The chuck reclines to a level position (Step 2), and the table then positions itself for fine alignment.

The fine alignment procedure (Step 3) is progr...