Browse Prior Art Database

MLC Laser Sizing System Cooling System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051106D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chiaiese, VC: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A CO(2) circulating gas laser, rated at 1.2 kW, and continuously discharging infrared laser radiation at a wavelength of 10.6 Mum, is designed to cut multilayer "unfired" ceramic substrates. The laser beam has a diameter of 0.0254 cm (0.010 in.) and is stationary. The laminate, mounted on a vacuum chuck assembly, is indexed under the laser beam.

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MLC Laser Sizing System Cooling System

A CO(2) circulating gas laser, rated at 1.2 kW, and continuously discharging infrared laser radiation at a wavelength of
10.6 Mum, is designed to cut multilayer "unfired" ceramic substrates. The laser beam has a diameter of 0.0254 cm (0.010 in.) and is stationary. The laminate, mounted on a vacuum chuck assembly, is indexed under the laser beam.

This laser-cutting technique can achieve qualities of cut edge profile and surface texture that are comparable to flat, vertical, sawed or milled edges.

The objective of this system is to increase the laser power and velocity for a given gas mixture, voltage, and current in order to prevent movement of a Folding Mirror path due to cooling system pressure fluctuations or temperature changes.

The gas mixture in a closed-loop axial flow CO(2) laser goes through three distinct temperature changes' First, it is heated as it passes through an electric arc. Second, it loses some heat through the lasing process. Third, it is cooled down by internal heat exchangers before it goes through the electric arc again.

For quantum mechanical reasons, the colder the gas mixture is as it enters through the electric arc, the more efficient the lasing process will be. The lower level to the pre-arc temperature is when the gases start experiencing a phase change from gas to liquid. For maximum efficiency, the pre-arc gas temperature should be just above the condensation temperature. This is the first requirement placed on the cooling system.

The second requirement is that the cooli...