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Invoking Interactive Commands From Within a Program

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051127D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brooks, AP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In the DPPX operating system, a function invoked by one command can invoke a second function by the procedures of the assembler language macro CALLCMD. The system preserves the use of only one version of any function and only one interface between functions.

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Invoking Interactive Commands From Within a Program

In the DPPX operating system, a function invoked by one command can invoke a second function by the procedures of the assembler language macro CALLCMD. The system preserves the use of only one version of any function and only one interface between functions.

Under the DPPX operating system, a program for a particular function is called a function (or a command processor), and it is invoked by a "Command". A program that is made up of a series of commands and associated control statements Is called a "Command List". In an operation from a terminal, a command is transmitted through two programs called "I/O Facilities" and "Command Facilities" and then to the function. All of these programs have a code (called the interface) that transmits information from one program to the next in sequence. It is a general design objective to use only standard interface codes. When programs are written in assembler language, a macro CALLCMD provides the code for relating a command to a function. Sometimes one function must use a second function that is otherwise independent. For example, the command string could include "command 1 ... command 2". It is desirable to permit the user to specify "command 2" and let this command cause command 1 and then command 2 to be executed. Typically, this combination has involved either a separate version of function 1 that is only called by function 2 or a separate interface so that function 2...