Browse Prior Art Database

Hot Electron Light Emitter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051213D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

DiMaria, DJ: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Surface plasmon light emission in a semiconductor structure can be enhanced through the addition of an electron injector that injects electrons from the conduction band of the injector into a thin metal electrode.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Hot Electron Light Emitter

Surface plasmon light emission in a semiconductor structure can be enhanced through the addition of an electron injector that injects electrons from the conduction band of the injector into a thin metal electrode.

Electrons from the conduction band of silicon (the silicon may be replaced by a refractory metal) are injected into SiO(2) through an intervening layer of Si-rich SiO(2) which provides a large current density at low applied fields. The silicon islands can build up a reversible electronic charge, screening the field at points of possible destructive breakdown. Simultaneously, the irregular shape of the islands enhances the local field at the Si-rich/SiO interface. Less voltage is needed to inject a given current into the oxide.

Lifetime of the device will be limited by charge-trapping related breakdown of the SiO(2). This can be reduced by suitable high-temperature annealing. Also, a small amount of silicon inclusions may be introduced into the SiO(2). This allows trapped charge to drain slowly to the contacts.

As also shown in Fig. 1, some electrons may become hot with respect to the SiO(2) conduction band. Most will have an energy roughly equal to the difference between the SiO(2) conduction band and the chemical potential of the metal electrode. This is on the order of 4 volts, considerably higher than what is possible with thin tunneling Metal Insulator Metal (MIM) structures. Au or Ag may be used as electrode metals for visible light generation as they have well-defined surface plasm...