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Dynamic Audio Cues for Permission Verification in a Tailgating Environment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051265D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Feb-10
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 1 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

In a typical office environment badge readers or other access control devices are employed to limit physical access. While inexpensive, the chief problem with these lock-controlling additions to a door is that they invariably cause authenticated employees to allow tailgaiting of others. A solution to this problem is to implement a changing set of clearly related audio cues. By allowing someone holding open the door to hear a unique cue and to understand the next cue in the sequence through common knowledge, you remove the ability of someone to simulate the audio cue in order to pretend to have authenticated successfully.

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Dynamic Audio Cues for Permission Verification in a Tailgating Environment

In a typical office environment badge readers or other access control devices are employed to limit physical access. While inexpensive, the chief problem with these lock-controlling additions to a door is that they invariably cause authenticated employees to allow tailgaiting of others.

To combat this most access devices employ an audio cue to allow anyone holding open the door to verify with no extra effort if anyone else who badges in is allowed access through the door. The problem with this is that because the audio cues are fixed they can be remotely recorded and played back using a hidden device. Paired with a realistic facsimile of any access hardware (badge, proximity indicator, etc) such a device would fool any casual observer holding open a door to think the access device was allowing the person access.

While there are a number of other physically secure ways to ensure only one person enters through a door at a time, they typically require efforts in labor or construction that are beyond what an organization is willing to invest. Additionally, efforts to curb the habit of tailgaiting through auditing and guidelines rarely completely end the practice.

When the first person authenticates against the access control device, they hear the initial cue. ("Alpha", perhaps) Anyone who badges in while the door is still open would cause the access control device to play the next prompt in the sequence ("Beta"). These cues would be generated from a data store using a text to speech synthesize...