Browse Prior Art Database

Continuous Underlining with a Wire Matrix Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051294D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Laraman, GR: AUTHOR

Abstract

Conventional wire matrix printers print characters in only a portion of the allocated matrix. The area between printed characters, called the no-print zone, allows the printer logic circuits time to preprocess for printing the next character, thereby enhancing the printing speed. The necessity for a no-print zone makes it impossible to provide a solid continuous underline of a portion of text since no printing can occur in the no-print zone.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 87% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Continuous Underlining with a Wire Matrix Printer

Conventional wire matrix printers print characters in only a portion of the allocated matrix. The area between printed characters, called the no-print zone, allows the printer logic circuits time to preprocess for printing the next character, thereby enhancing the printing speed. The necessity for a no-print zone makes it impossible to provide a solid continuous underline of a portion of text since no printing can occur in the no-print zone.

It is proposed here that a continuous underline field can be printed on a second pass of the printer. This may be accomplished by slowing the printer to half speed in order that the dots are close together and then continuously firing the underline wire to print as the head moves across the record medium at half speed. The control logic associated with the printer can be used to decode the start underline and stop underline codes and thereby control when the underline wire is fired during the second pass. Such logic would initially ignore the start and stop underline codes during the printing of normal texts, but would store the location of the start and stop underlining so that on a subsequent second pass only the desired part of the text would be underlined.

By using this technique, the printer still has the available no print zone in which to preprocess the information from the next character as well as the ability to provide a continuous underline. One additional advantage...