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Browse Prior Art Database

Module Cap Cover

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051337D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Thomas, EL: AUTHOR

Abstract

Many electronic components are mounted on a pinned substrate which is, in turn, soldered into a printed circuit board. In order to keep the pinned substrate from being inserted too far into the printed circuit board and in order to maintain a desired standoff of the module from the printed circuit boards, certain of the pins are deformed so that the module will not slide too far into the printed circuit board. Deforming these pins is costly, and also causes the scraping of some components.

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Module Cap Cover

Many electronic components are mounted on a pinned substrate which is, in turn, soldered into a printed circuit board. In order to keep the pinned substrate from being inserted too far into the printed circuit board and in order to maintain a desired standoff of the module from the printed circuit boards, certain of the pins are deformed so that the module will not slide too far into the printed circuit board. Deforming these pins is costly, and also causes the scraping of some components.

The pin modules on which integrated circuits are mounted generally have a metal cover covering the module. The function of holding the module away from the printed circuit board can be performed by having legs protrude from this metal cover to the printed circuit board. These legs can either be located at the corner of the cover or at some intermediate location along the edge of the cover. These legs can be an integral part of the metal cap and merely an extension of the metal cap down to the circuit board. A dip coat on the bottom portion of the legs insures that the cap contact points will not wear through the printed circuit structure insulation. The coating also promotes a sliding action between the cap's contact points and the printed circuit board insulation, thereby relieving some thermal and mechanical stress.

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