Browse Prior Art Database

Non Chatter Drive Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051473D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Karsch, AF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The output device for a paper transport mechanism traditionally contain a drive motor. Usually the motor is a synchronous or uniform speed type wherein the driving torque is applied constantly while running. When used in a strip chart recorder, the motor is coupled through an overunning clutch to the paper drive roller, by either gears or belts. In known recorders, this arrangement performs satisfactorily.

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Non Chatter Drive Device

The output device for a paper transport mechanism traditionally contain a drive motor. Usually the motor is a synchronous or uniform speed type wherein the driving torque is applied constantly while running. When used in a strip chart recorder, the motor is coupled through an overunning clutch to the paper drive roller, by either gears or belts. In known recorders, this arrangement performs satisfactorily.

In this article, the drive motor is changed to a stepper motor. This change takes advantage of the simplicity inherent in the logic and software which drives the motor in discrete steps. The change to a stepper motor, however, allows the over-running clutch to run unloaded between each discrete stepper motor step. This causes a chattering of the output drive roller, resulting in unwanted additional slipping of the output paper.

To solve this problem and retain the stepper motor, a simple device is added to an over-running clutch 1 which is hub-mounted on drive shaft 2 of a stepper motor (not shown). An axial load is interposed between pulley 3 and mating sleeve 4 in the form of a wavy spring washer 5. The axial load generated by washer 5 prevents over-running clutch 1 from "falling back" or declutching during each unloaded step of the stepper motor.

The addition of the axial load on over-running clutch 1 eliminates the chatter in the output drive roller while retaining the use of the stepper motor. The use of the stepper motor saves ele...