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Electrocardiogram Recording with Preprocessed Data

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051484D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 4 page(s) / 82K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bonner, RE: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

This article relates to the computer processing of 24-hour Holter EKG tapes. More specifically, it relates to an approach which reduces the time required for processing such EKG tapes.

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Electrocardiogram Recording with Preprocessed Data

This article relates to the computer processing of 24-hour Holter EKG tapes. More specifically, it relates to an approach which reduces the time required for processing such EKG tapes.

In the present approach, analog EKG data is recorded for 24 hours in the usual way on one track of a magnetic tape. At the same time, point selection preprocessing is performed on the EKG data by a microprocessor and, when a point is selected, a timing mark is recorded on a second track called the point selection track. Fig. 1 shows a sample EKG waveform 1 which includes a number of selected points. In Fig. 1, pulse train 2 (A/D Clock) is a train of pulses which are utilized to sample EKG waveform 1 at a desired sampling rate. When EKG waveform 1 has been processed in a point selection processor, point selected timing marks are provided at the output of a microprocessor. Fig. 1 shows a representative pulse train 3 (Point Selected Timing Marks). Waveform 4 (Recorded Timing Marks) in Fig. 1 is a waveform of the magnetic flux reversals recorded on the magnetic tape of an ambulatory EKG recorder. Pulse train 5 (Playback Timing Marks After Shaping) is used as a clock in an EKG playback scanner to sample the analog EKG previously recorded with the Point Selected Timing Marks.

When the tape is played back in a high speed scanner, only the points of the EKG waveform of the first track selected by the Point Selected Timing Marks of track 2 need to be processed by the computer EKG algorithm.

Fig. 2 shows a tape recording format for two EKG leads. The information on tracks 1 and 2 is similar to that shown in waveform 1 and pulse train 3, respectively, of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a block diagram of a recording system. In Fig. 3, EKG waveform 1 is applied at the input of an amplifier 10. The output of amplifier 10 is applied to a write amplifier 11 which drives a recording head to record EKG waveform 1 on the magnetic tape of an ambulatory tape recorder. The output of amplifier 10 is simultaneously applied to a sample and hold (S/H) circuit...