Browse Prior Art Database

Computer Aided Terminal Scanner

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051504D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 3 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Floid, RE: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The computer-aided terminal scanner system is a test tool that allows the user to record and playback keystrokes at the keyboard/screen interface of a multi-terminal system. This enables the user to record keystrokes issued by operators during a particular terminal system test. The recorded keystrokes can then be played back for testing purposes without the need for operators to reenter keystrokes. The recorded session can also be used for keystroke analysis or altered and mixed with other recorded sessions and played back to the terminal system under test.

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Computer Aided Terminal Scanner

The computer-aided terminal scanner system is a test tool that allows the user to record and playback keystrokes at the keyboard/screen interface of a multi-terminal system. This enables the user to record keystrokes issued by operators during a particular terminal system test. The recorded keystrokes can then be played back for testing purposes without the need for operators to reenter keystrokes. The recorded session can also be used for keystroke analysis or altered and mixed with other recorded sessions and played back to the terminal system under test.

The system consists of three distinct units, as shown in Fig. 1: the keystroke intercept circuit 1, the scanner 2 and the control computer 3. The system has two modes of operation: (1) read mode, when keystrokes are captured and recorded from operator inputs at the keyboard terminal, and (2) write mode, when keystrokes are automatically played back to the screen 5. The intercept circuit 1 is located at each terminal location and is used to monitor keystroke activity. The keyboard 4 is disconnected from the screen 5 enclosure and connected to the intercept circuit 1. Signals to and from the keyboard 4 are intercepted by the intercept circuit 1. A cable completes the circuit from each intercept circuit 1 to the screen enclosed.

The intercept circuits 1 are connected to the scanner 2 by a long (50 ft.) multi-pair cable that contains a bidirectional bus. The scanner 2 receives and sends keystroke data from the intercept circuits and routes them to the control computer 3 through the channel interface 6. The scanner 2 monitors or drives up to sixteen intercept circuits 1, one at a time in a computer-controlled sequence through multiplexers and demultiplexers. Control information and keystroke data to and from the control computer 3 are transmitted to the scanner 2 through the channel interface 6. Keystroke data to and from the scanner 2 can be written into and read out of disk storage 7 through the control computer channel under the control of the processor 8. The processor 8 is also used to measure elapsed time between keystrokes and to tag keystrokes with respect to the terminal, and it includes this in the information stored in the disk 7.

The software used to drive the control computer 3 to perform these tasks consists of three interactive programs. The scanner program controls the reading and writing of keystrokes through the scanner 2. The disk write program controls the recording of keystrokes, timing, and terminal information on the disk
7. The disk read program controls the writing of keystrokes from the disk 7 out to the scanner 2 and intercept circuit 1 in relationship to the timing and terminal data. The control computer's display station 9 is used for operator control of the system software. The control computer's printer 10 is used for printing out keystrokes for analysis. The control computer main storage 11 is used for program storage a...