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Module In Place Testing Autoguided Probe. Isolation And Diagnostic Technique

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051542D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jackson, EW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Module-In-Place Testing (MIPT) is a test strategy that uses physical partitioning of a printed circuit board (PCB) to minimize test generation and fault simulation costs. MIPT uses the original module test pattern (also test data from the source of the module) to test the PCB. This test method requires that the modules/regions contain additional control (enable/inhibit) circuitry that will inhibit (place in high impedance state) or enable all "module/region" output drivers. Present isolation technique requires that an Internal Test Point (ITP) control each MIPT module or region inhibit/enable control circuitry. The number of ITPs required may exceed the number of ITPs available on the tester. available on some testers, to reduce the number of ITPs required to do MIPT.

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Module In Place Testing Autoguided Probe. Isolation And Diagnostic Technique

Module-In-Place Testing (MIPT) is a test strategy that uses physical partitioning of a printed circuit board (PCB) to minimize test generation and fault simulation costs. MIPT uses the original module test pattern (also test data from the source of the module) to test the PCB. This test method requires that the modules/regions contain additional control (enable/inhibit) circuitry that will inhibit (place in high impedance state) or enable all "module/region" output drivers. Present isolation technique requires that an Internal Test Point (ITP) control each MIPT module or region inhibit/enable control circuitry. The number of ITPs required may exceed the number of ITPs available on the tester. available on some testers, to reduce the number of ITPs required to do MIPT.

There are testers that have motor-driven, autoguided probe(s). These automatically guided probes are controlled by tester software (i.e., Real Time Diagnostic Probe Algorithms), which directs the probe(s) to as many probable nodes as are required to diagnose a defect to the lowest repairable or replaceable unit.

Fig. 1 illustrates the device under test (DUT). The internal test points (ITPs) contact the DUT from the PCB's component side, and the software-guided probe contacts the DUT from the solder side.

The probe can also be used to inhibit or enable selected modules during Module-In-Place Testing. Fig. 2 illustrates the a...