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Heat Sink With Internal Holes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051550D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Andros, FE: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

The use of heat sinks on integrated circuit modules is a well established practice. Conventional heat sinks usually consist of a number of straight rectangular fins or pin fins attached to a base plate. The base plate is, in turn, attached to the surface of the integrated circuit module. The choice of fin height, thickness, spacing, etc., is made based on the type of cooling fluid, mode of heat transfer, power dissipation, and operating temperature.

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Heat Sink With Internal Holes

The use of heat sinks on integrated circuit modules is a well established practice. Conventional heat sinks usually consist of a number of straight rectangular fins or pin fins attached to a base plate. The base plate is, in turn, attached to the surface of the integrated circuit module. The choice of fin height, thickness, spacing, etc., is made based on the type of cooling fluid, mode of heat transfer, power dissipation, and operating temperature.

Heat sinks attached to integrated circuits must also satisfy other "practical" requirements. For example, there is a need for a convenient easily visible place to print a legible module identification. This identification must be visible when the modules are mounted on a printed circuit card or board in a brick walled configuration or in conjunction with a plurality of other components. Furthermore, the heat sink must fit within the physical constraints of the integrated circuit package while simultaneously providing sufficient thermal performance.

The heat sink shown above provides a surface which can be used to place a visible, legible marking on the module, and it provides good thermal performance without requiring an undue amount of space.

With the heat sink shown above in natural convection, higher air velocities are induced in the enclosed passages (due to the density gradient which is set up between the inlet and exhaust of each of the individual passages) than would be achievable...