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Separation of Error Correcting Code Errors and Addressing Errors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051618D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bossen, DC: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Syndrome patterns permit decoding address errors from data errors wher the address of data in memory is encoded with data, as described in U.S. Patent 3,231,858. For instance, in a stored code word consisting of 64 data bits and 8 check bits generated by combining the 64 data bits with 9 address bits using a code like those set forth in U.S. Patent 3,623,155, the 8 syndromes S(0) to S(7) generated from the accessed code word and the address of the accessed code word would indicate an uncorrectable error in one of the 6 patterns illustrated in Fig. 1. Thus, a computer system, as illustrated in Fig. 2, could distinguish the errors by having the service processor 10 upon detection of a multiple bit error (UE) do a Diagnostic Fetch which will read the data and force a fetch of the syndrome data to the system processor 12.

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Separation of Error Correcting Code Errors and Addressing Errors

Syndrome patterns permit decoding address errors from data errors wher the address of data in memory is encoded with data, as described in U.S. Patent 3,231,858. For instance, in a stored code word consisting of 64 data bits and 8 check bits generated by combining the 64 data bits with 9 address bits using a code like those set forth in U.S. Patent 3,623,155, the 8 syndromes S(0) to S(7) generated from the accessed code word and the address of the accessed code word would indicate an uncorrectable error in one of the 6 patterns illustrated in Fig. 1. Thus, a computer system, as illustrated in Fig. 2, could distinguish the errors by having the service processor 10 upon detection of a multiple bit error (UE) do a Diagnostic Fetch which will read the data and force a fetch of the syndrome data to the system processor 12.

An addressing error is easily determined by a comparison of the set of syndromes with the sets shown in Fig. 1 to see if there is a match.

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