Browse Prior Art Database

Electrical Connectors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051704D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bauman, AH: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The increasing circuit density made possible by large-scale integration (LSI) has impacted the electrical connectors used to interconnect the LSI chips. This impact has been to increase the number of contacts per module, consequently the physical size and the cost. Computer circuits operate at sufficiently low voltage and current levels (dry circuits) to require precious metal contacts to assure a reliable electrical connection, thereby further increasing costs. As the number of contacts increase, so does the force required to mate the module to its socket. There is a force limit beyond which some form of assistance must be provided to mate and unmate very dense connectors.

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Electrical Connectors

The increasing circuit density made possible by large-scale integration (LSI) has impacted the electrical connectors used to interconnect the LSI chips. This impact has been to increase the number of contacts per module, consequently the physical size and the cost. Computer circuits operate at sufficiently low voltage and current levels (dry circuits) to require precious metal contacts to assure a reliable electrical connection, thereby further increasing costs. As the number of contacts increase, so does the force required to mate the module to its socket. There is a force limit beyond which some form of assistance must be provided to mate and unmate very dense connectors.

Several related versions of dry connectors are described. In the first version (Fig. 1), a connector has one of the two contacting elements composed of a low melting point solder pad coated with a removable protective coating. The connector contains very little or no precious metal to minimize costs. The mating member of the connector is a spring member that is designed to displace both the protective coating and the solder surface to provide a gas tight area at least equal to the cross section of the spring member. This spring member is intended to be the reusable half of the contact pair. Should the spring require protection from corrosion, noble metal plating or stainless steel may be used.

A second version (Fig. 2) uses the bending of a simple cantilever beam to store the energy to provide contact pressure and sideways travel for contact wipe. This version enables many mating and unmating cycles for the same or different components. This is accomplished by adding a precio...