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Browse Prior Art Database

Hot Plate Heating of Photoresist

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051732D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bergeron, RJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A photoresist structure indicated in Fig. 1 at 10 deposited on a given layer or semiconductor substrate 12, which may be formed by a known image reversal process, is plasma hardened to increase the strength of the photoresist after all baking steps prior to plasma hardening and post plasma baking are performed by using a hot plate 14 instead of an oven to avoid or minimize wrinkles at the surface of the photoresist structure 10.

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Hot Plate Heating of Photoresist

A photoresist structure indicated in Fig. 1 at 10 deposited on a given layer or semiconductor substrate 12, which may be formed by a known image reversal process, is plasma hardened to increase the strength of the photoresist after all baking steps prior to plasma hardening and post plasma baking are performed by using a hot plate 14 instead of an oven to avoid or minimize wrinkles at the surface of the photoresist structure 10.

By using hot plate 14, during the post apply bake period a first dryer solvent- free layer 16 is formed at the lower portion of the photoresist structure 10 and during the post expose bake period a second dryer solvent-free layer 18 is formed at the lower portion of the photoresist structure 10, moving the first layer 16 toward the surface, as indicated in Fig. 2. During the plasma-hardening period a plasma skin 20 is formed on the upper surface and sides of photoresist structure 10, as indicated in Fig. 3.

During the post plasma bake period, which may be at temperatures as high as 150 degrees C, the solvent remaining in the upper portion of photoresist structure 10 can readily escape to the atmosphere, as indicated in Fig. 4 without producing any significant wrinkles at the upper surface of the photoresist structure. If photoresist structure 10 had been baked in an oven, the dryer solvent-free layers 16 and 18 would have been formed at the upper portion of structure 10, trapping the solvents and causing s...