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Browse Prior Art Database

Piggy Back Card Packaging

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051742D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kehley, GL: AUTHOR

Abstract

The piggy-back package is a simple inexpensive method in which to package 3 high cards or cards that have approximately 4.5 inches of card height area available for circuit components and wiring into a 6 high card environment, having approximately 9.0 inches of card height available, while maintaining electrical continuity and compatibility. This method sets one 3 high card 10 on top of another 11 with a pinned board segment 12 acting as the connecting interface. This three-part assembly is then latched together with a plastic card holder 13. The top or piggy-backed card may have top contacts and housings or may be a plain top card.

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Piggy Back Card Packaging

The piggy-back package is a simple inexpensive method in which to package 3 high cards or cards that have approximately 4.5 inches of card height area available for circuit components and wiring into a 6 high card environment, having approximately 9.0 inches of card height available, while maintaining electrical continuity and compatibility. This method sets one 3 high card 10 on top of another 11 with a pinned board segment 12 acting as the connecting interface. This three-part assembly is then latched together with a plastic card holder 13. The top or piggy-backed card may have top contacts and housings or may be a plain top card.

The present design is adaptable to many current card technology packaging techniques with only limited new hardware required. It is also adaptable to many card widths. New machines are sometimes developed using 6 high cards and are ultimately reduced to 3 high at the production level. The piggy-backing technique allows this normal evolution.

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