Browse Prior Art Database

Interposer Flight Path Control Using an Energy Absorbing Bail

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051797D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-10
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Vitek, EJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

In a typewriter keyboard, when the interposer returns to the home position, it is in a free-flight condition influenced primarily by a restore spring. Interposer 10 will have a tendency to rebound from the frame of the typewriter when it impacts it, thus potentially causing a malselection and a second undesired cycle. To overcome this tendency, the rear slope 14 of the interposer is caused to approximate a slope flatter than the direction of restore movement.

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Interposer Flight Path Control Using an Energy Absorbing Bail

In a typewriter keyboard, when the interposer returns to the home position, it is in a free-flight condition influenced primarily by a restore spring. Interposer 10 will have a tendency to rebound from the frame of the typewriter when it impacts it, thus potentially causing a malselection and a second undesired cycle. To overcome this tendency, the rear slope 14 of the interposer is caused to approximate a slope flatter than the direction of restore movement.

As the interposer is moved upward and toward its home position (Fig. 1) by spring 12, the rear slope 14 of the interposer will engage the energy bail 16 (Fig.
2). As the upward component of force exerted by interposer 10 acts on bail 16, the bail is lifted and thus consumes energy. Inasmuch as bail 16 is not rigidly attached to the frame of the typewriter, it will raise with interposer 10 and thus absorb the force rather than causing a bounce of interposer 10 downward, initiating an undesired cycle. As interposer 10 continues to restore into its normal position, the bail 16 dissipates the force and work done on it by sliding down the rear slope 14 of interposer 10 until it engages its travel-limiting surface 18.

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