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Diagnostic System Test in a Concurrent Environment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051828D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-11
Document File: 4 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bergh, RH: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Programs are written to allow the testing and diagnosing of the hardwar of a computer system on a system basis, thus providing a mechanism to recreate or test for intermittent/interactive problems while still operating in a concurrent (with customer applications) environment.

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Diagnostic System Test in a Concurrent Environment

Programs are written to allow the testing and diagnosing of the hardwar of a computer system on a system basis, thus providing a mechanism to recreate or test for intermittent/interactive problems while still operating in a concurrent (with customer applications) environment.

There are two modules, an input/output (I/O) exerciser (to exercise I/O devices attached to the computer system) and a central processing unit (CPU) exerciser (to exercise system components such as CPU, storage, virtual address translator, etc.). The I/O exerciser executes I/O program pairs on the I/O devices attached to the system. The purpose of program pairs is to provide a program to exercise an I/O device, and to provide a program to collect information if the first program terminates with an exception. This information is then displayed. In addition to this, the I/0 exerciser selectively starts the CPU exerciser at a lower program priority, as shown in Fig. 1.

The CPU exerciser is composed of two main parts. One part moves varying- length blocks of data between all the files on the system. The other part exercises the instruction set by building and executing a variable-length, variable- mix instruction stream.

Part one of the CPU exerciser uses the Move Logical Characters Long (MVLC) instruction to move varying length blocks of data between all the files on the system. The success or failure of these moves is determined by the Compare Logical Characters Long (CLCL) instruction, which compares the moved data with the source data and sets the condition code accordingly. Each file on the system has two 65K segments assigned to it. The program moves data blocks between segments on the same file, as well as between files. All the possible file-to-file move combinations are exercised. The second part of the CPU exerciser is designed to provide a maximum stress, user-tailorable environment for the computer system. The instructions to be exercised are located in an index and have the format shown in Fig. 2. The basic unit of information in an index is the argument, which is composed of prefix and suffix. In this design, the prefix, or search key, is the instruction opcode. Setup instructions are present only when necessary to provide valid instruction operands. The instructions can also access a common work area for their operands.

These instruction pack...