Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic Disk Stacking Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051836D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-11
Document File: 2 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ciraulo, AR: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A device for automatically stacking and retrieving magnetic recording disks is disclosed in U.S. Patent 3,315,840. In that patent, the disks are shown driven at their inner diameter by three lead screws concurrently rotated by a drive system in the base of the device. Other drives can be substituted for the lead screws disclosed in the patent

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Automatic Disk Stacking Devices

A device for automatically stacking and retrieving magnetic recording disks is disclosed in U.S. Patent 3,315,840. In that patent, the disks are shown driven at their inner diameter by three lead screws concurrently rotated by a drive system in the base of the device. Other drives can be substituted for the lead screws disclosed in the patent

In Fig. 1, a disk stacking device is shown sectioned across the device to disclose a drive means using chain links members spaced 120ø apart to handle the disks 2 at their inner diameter. The chain link members (three required) include spaced teeth 3, such as found in timing belts, to support the disks 2. The drive system for the chains 1 includes a power lead screw 4 and nut 5 which is rotated by a drive system 6 connected to a motor 7. The chains 1 and power lead screw 4 are located inside of a column 8 that extends over the height of the disk-stacking device. The chains 1 operate on the outside of the column 8 in a guide (not shown). The chains operate on rollers 9 at the top and bottom of the column 8.

Fig. 2 discloses details of a chain link type of drive and support. Link arrays 11 are retained by paired extending pins 12 with a double pitch spacing to provide an angular chordal displacement for supporting the disks. The disk- supporting arms 13 of the link arrays 11 can be made from a plastic material to prevent damaging the disks during the storage and removal operations. The plastic links can be molded, and the replacement of broken links is possible without discarding the entire chain assembly.

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