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Continuous Pole DC Motor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051860D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-11
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dang, C: AUTHOR

Abstract

The motor according to the design shown in the figures has an increase in its efficiency and performance by virtue of its cylindrical shape. Its output torque is increased by increasing the radius of moment without increasing the length of the end turns. The efficiency of a motor is increased because the ratio of the length of active conductor to the length of the end turns is also increased. A low constant speed can be obtained since a continuous pole is used in its construction. Sliding contacts replace the commutator and brushes of standard DC motors.

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Continuous Pole DC Motor

The motor according to the design shown in the figures has an increase in its efficiency and performance by virtue of its cylindrical shape. Its output torque is increased by increasing the radius of moment without increasing the length of the end turns. The efficiency of a motor is increased because the ratio of the length of active conductor to the length of the end turns is also increased. A low constant speed can be obtained since a continuous pole is used in its construction. Sliding contacts replace the commutator and brushes of standard DC motors.

Fig. 1 shows a cut side view of the motor. The armature is fastened to the shaft assembly. A magnetic conductive housing supports two flat permanent magnets on each side of the armature. Magnetic bearings support the housing from the armature and shaft assembly. From a front view the motor has a cylindrical shape which is very important for the operation of the magnetic interface.

Fig. 2 shows four coils in the specific design of the motor, but it should be understood that the number of coils can be increased. A magnetic insulation material supports the coils of the armature onto the shaft. The current flow is shown by the arrows and lines in the coils with the current I shown by the arrows. The theory of operation of the motor is shown in Fig. 3.

One pole piece is shown in Fig. 3, with the current flow shown in the direction of the arrows and lines. While the armature is rotating around...