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Gated Schottky Barrier Diode

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051919D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-11
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Atwood, BC: AUTHOR

Abstract

A gated Schottky barrier diode (SBD) arranged to change the shape of the electric field around a Schottky barrier diode formed on a silicon substrate is used for making comprehensive studies of the diode.

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Gated Schottky Barrier Diode

A gated Schottky barrier diode (SBD) arranged to change the shape of the electric field around a Schottky barrier diode formed on a silicon substrate is used for making comprehensive studies of the diode.

On a silicon substrate or wafer 10, layers of silicon dioxide 12 and silicon nitride 14 are formed having an opening 16 therein. As indicated in Fig. 1, silicon dioxide layer 12 is etched so as to be undercut with respect to silicon nitride layer
14. A thin layer of any known Schottky barrier diode metal is then deposited on silicon nitride layer 14 and on the surface of silicon substrate 10 through opening
16. Due to the overhanging edges of silicon nitride layer 14 and the thinness of the SBD metal, the portion of the SBD metal in contact with substrate 10 forms a Schottky barrier diode 18 which is separated from but in the proximity of the gate metal 20. Layers 12 and 14 may have a thickness of 2000 angstroms and 800 angstroms, respectively, with the SBD metal having a thickness of about 2000 angstroms for adequate electrical separation between SBD 18 and its gate metal 20 while permitting depletion regions of SBD 18 and gate metal 20 to merge.

For very small diodes an extended metal line or stripe may be provided for connection to a pad, as indicated in Figs. 2 and 3, where Fig. 2 is a sectional view and Fig. 3 is a top view, and where elements similar to those shown in Fig. 1 have the same reference numbers.

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