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"O" Repeat Bipolar Code

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051932D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-11
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kam, PK: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a scheme for coding data consisting of either a train of "1"s or "0"s without any transitions, which scheme permits the proper detection of the data at a receiver without losing bit synchronization between the transmitter and the receiver.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 65% of the total text.

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"O" Repeat Bipolar Code

This article describes a scheme for coding data consisting of either a train of "1"s or "0"s without any transitions, which scheme permits the proper detection of the data at a receiver without losing bit synchronization between the transmitter and the receiver.

In digital communication systems, a transmitter generates a series of "0"s and "1"s, representing data, into a communication channel. At the receiving end, in order to recover the data, the receiver must generate a clock signal which is in synchronization with the bits of the data stream. The conventional synchronization scheme used is that of detecting the transitions between a "0" and "1" in the data stream.

This transition is used as a reference edge, and the clock at the receiver is then brought into phase with the data and the data is sampled at the middle of a bit cell. Difficulties are created, however, when a train of "1"s or "0"s is present in the data stream.

A number of solutions are presently in use for this problem; however, they either sacrifice data rate or are somewhat complicated to implement. Some of these known coding solutions include inserting a clock bit between each data bit, Manchester Code, high density bipolar code, and pair selected ternary.

The "O" repeat bipolar code is based on the following criterion:

1. Data Representation

Positive voltage is represented by a "1" bit, and

negative voltage is represented by a "0" bit. "O"

voltage indicates the repetit...