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Browse Prior Art Database

Ion Milling Technique to Reflow Solder Pads

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051952D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-11
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Herdzik, RJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The procedure here for fluxless solder mound reflow comprises ion milli solder pads long enough to remove surface oxides, which now removed and while still in the vacuum chamber, the stage on which the wafers are mounted on is heated to a temperature high enough to reflow solder pads. The environment during reflow could vary; it could be a vacuum, hydrogen or an inert atmosphere. The advantage of this reflow procedure, without flux and oxide-free, is due to ion milling solder oxides.

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Ion Milling Technique to Reflow Solder Pads

The procedure here for fluxless solder mound reflow comprises ion milli solder pads long enough to remove surface oxides, which now removed and while still in the vacuum chamber, the stage on which the wafers are mounted on is heated to a temperature high enough to reflow solder pads. The environment during reflow could vary; it could be a vacuum, hydrogen or an inert atmosphere. The advantage of this reflow procedure, without flux and oxide-free, is due to ion milling solder oxides.

The novelty here is in removing the oxide film for a short period of about 2 to 3 minutes and subsequently heating the substrate in the chamber on the same stage (with a heater) to reflow solder pads with the ion etching (gun) in the "off" condition (Figs. 1A and 1B).

This is a unique way of having a solder reflow process without the use of flux as in conventional systems.

The second advantage of ion milling for the first 2 to 3 minutes is that the "halo" effect is also "in situ" removed (Figs. 2A and 2B).

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