Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Timing Disk Controlled Print Head in Electroerosion Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000051987D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-11
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Burckardt, KH: AUTHOR

Abstract

In some metal paper printers the print head is moved along the line by stepping motor. Arranged on the axle of the stepping motor a timing disk 1 (Fig. 1) is provided which has a series of markings 2 towards the circumference. These markings are scanned and used for print-out control. For printers with a higher degree of resolution the print-out control pulses are to have a higher frequency than the motor advance pulses. For that reason the timing disk has fine markings 3 between markings 4 for the motor advance control.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 91% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Timing Disk Controlled Print Head in Electroerosion Printer

In some metal paper printers the print head is moved along the line by stepping motor. Arranged on the axle of the stepping motor a timing disk 1 (Fig.
1) is provided which has a series of markings 2 towards the circumference. These markings are scanned and used for print-out control. For printers with a higher degree of resolution the print-out control pulses are to have a higher frequency than the motor advance pulses. For that reason the timing disk has fine markings 3 between markings 4 for the motor advance control.

Any further fine subdividing of the timing disk has upper limits. In order to achieve an electric fine subdividing of the areas between two adjacent fine markings a voltage-controlled oscillator 5 (Fig. 2) is used which generates pulses of a specific frequency, e.g., rectangular pulses of the sequence frequency 24 kcps (average).

The output of oscillator 5 is connected to a frequency divider 6 whose pitch can be programmably set. To simplify matters it is assumed that frequency divider 6 has a pitch of 1:10 (generally l:n).

The output of frequency divider 6 is connected to a circuit 7 executing a frequency and phase comparison. As a reference value those pulses, e.g., with a sequence frequency of 2.4 kcps are used which are generated by the scanning of markings 2 (3 and 4) on timing disk 1. The output signal of comparator circuit 7 acts controllingly on oscillator 5 for obtaining an accu...