Browse Prior Art Database

Security Method for Remote Telephone Banking

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000052133D
Original Publication Date: 1981-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-11
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Svigals, J: AUTHOR

Abstract

Home telephones are being used to conduct business transactions with banks and stores. As part of these transactions, personal identification numbers, memorized by account holders, must be communicated in order that the bank or store can verify that the caller is the authorized owner of the account against which the transaction is to be posted. Because telephone lines can be tapped by unauthorized listeners, the communication of personal identification numbers is a security risk.

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Security Method for Remote Telephone Banking

Home telephones are being used to conduct business transactions with banks and stores. As part of these transactions, personal identification numbers, memorized by account holders, must be communicated in order that the bank or store can verify that the caller is the authorized owner of the account against which the transaction is to be posted. Because telephone lines can be tapped by unauthorized listeners, the communication of personal identification numbers is a security risk.

Of course, encryption equipment can be installed at the home telephone to encrypt the personal identification number entered at a key pad. The encryption equipment, however, adds significant cost and complexity at the home telephone, neither of which is desirable.

A level of security can be provided without any modification at the home telephone by printing a table at the bottom of each monthly statement mailed to the home. The table can be in the form shown below: See Original

The above table has twenty entries, each of which is a command combination. For example, top-blue yields the numeral 1, and right-black yields the numeral 9. The system would be used as follows: A computer at the central location would provide an entry command, such as top-blue, by voice over the telephone, and the home customer would look on the table printed on the customer's statement, mentally decode the command, and depress the correct dial button.

By issuing sever...