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Browse Prior Art Database

Organic Materials for Ablative Recording

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000052266D
Original Publication Date: 1981-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-11
Document File: 2 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Clarke, TC: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A new class of ablative recording materials for storage applications is described, and the class comprises semiconducting and conducting polymer films. The storage device can be made in two different embodiments. In the first embodiment the storage device comprises a layered structure on a suitable substrate, such as glass, with a thin, opaque, highly reflecting metal film deposited on the substrate, and a thin film of the polymer material deposited on the metal film. The second embodiment comprises a thick film of the polymer material deposited on the substrate.

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Organic Materials for Ablative Recording

A new class of ablative recording materials for storage applications is described, and the class comprises semiconducting and conducting polymer films. The storage device can be made in two different embodiments. In the first embodiment the storage device comprises a layered structure on a suitable substrate, such as glass, with a thin, opaque, highly reflecting metal film deposited on the substrate, and a thin film of the polymer material deposited on the metal film. The second embodiment comprises a thick film of the polymer material deposited on the substrate.

Writing is effected through the use of an incident laser beam of proper wavelength and sufficient energy to cause physical destruction and/or chemical modification of the polymer material. The change is accompanied by a significant alteration of the reflectivity of the material, which can be read out optically. Conducting or semiconducting polymers are particularly suited for ablative recording technology since they possess band gaps lying on the low energy side of the visible and near-infrared optical spectrum. Thus, they have the very high optical densities necessary for the efficient absorption of energy contained in the emission spectrum of common practical lasers (Ar, He-Ne, GaAs).

In addition, being organic substances, the decomposition temperatures of conducting and semiconducting polymers generally lie lower than the melting points of conventional metals and semiconductors, yet their specific heats and thermal conductivities are similar in magnitude to the latter. Therefore, the polymer compounds require lower expenditure of laser energy than current ablative recording materials.

Furthermore, techniques of organic s...