Browse Prior Art Database

Double Pass Screening

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000052375D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-11
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

LaRose, J: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

One of the steps in plasma panel fabrication involves the application a thick film dielectric over a conductor array on a pair of glass substrates using a screening process. However, on large substrates, the screening process produced problems in the form of pinholes and voids in the dielectric. This problem was resolved by converting to a two-pass screening operation during which one-half the required amount of dielectric paste was deposited on each pass. While this solved the pinhole problem, it required a drying cycle for the substrates between passes. The additional handling and time required to perform these extra operations was significant.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Double Pass Screening

One of the steps in plasma panel fabrication involves the application a thick film dielectric over a conductor array on a pair of glass substrates using a screening process. However, on large substrates, the screening process produced problems in the form of pinholes and voids in the dielectric. This problem was resolved by converting to a two-pass screening operation during which one-half the required amount of dielectric paste was deposited on each pass. While this solved the pinhole problem, it required a drying cycle for the substrates between passes. The additional handling and time required to perform these extra operations was significant.

A double-pass or two-cycle screening process eliminated the extra drying and handling operations. The substrates are initially screened with one-half the required amount of paste, moved laterally a short distance and then screened again without being removed from the screening machine. This method fills in the voids and pinholes while the paste is still wet, but does not change the total amount of paste deposited on the substrate. The substrates are then dried in a single cycle and ready for final processing. The elimination of the extra operations reduced the processing time by almost one-half, producing a significant cost saving.

1