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Fluid Coupling for Ink Jet Printers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000052384D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-11
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Huber, DL: AUTHOR

Abstract

Proper performance of ink jet printers requires a continuous homogenou supply of ink to the nozzle orifice. Introduction of particulate contaminants or air may cause ink stream failure due to misdirection or unstable operating points. In servicing the ink delivery system on such printers, it is extremely difficult to prevent the introduction of contaminants (particularly air) into the system once the fluid seals are broken. Frequently after servicing, long operating periods are required to purge the trapped air from the ink system. A fluid connector is presented in this article which allows servicing or replacement of ink system components without the introduction of contaminants or entrapped air.

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Fluid Coupling for Ink Jet Printers

Proper performance of ink jet printers requires a continuous homogenou supply of ink to the nozzle orifice. Introduction of particulate contaminants or air may cause ink stream failure due to misdirection or unstable operating points. In servicing the ink delivery system on such printers, it is extremely difficult to prevent the introduction of contaminants (particularly air) into the system once the fluid seals are broken. Frequently after servicing, long operating periods are required to purge the trapped air from the ink system. A fluid connector is presented in this article which allows servicing or replacement of ink system components without the introduction of contaminants or entrapped air.

Referring now to the coupling 10 illustrated above, the principle of operation is similar to the familiar hypodermic syringe.

A hollow stainless steel needle 11 is employed to pierce consecutive sealing membranes 21, 31 and 41, respectively, and effect an air-tight fluid coupling.

The coupling separates along the parting or separation line 12.

Ink from the supply line or the like 13 enters a left-hand connector housing 14 and fills a cavity or the like 14A therein. Mounted at one end of the cavity 14A is a pierceable silicone rubber membrane
41. In a similar manner, ink occupies a cavity 15A in a right-hand connector housing 15, the cavity 15A being bounded at opposite ends by the pierceable rubber seals 21 and 31, respectively. When the left- and right-hand connector housings 14 and 15 are brought together, the corresponding membra...