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Electrostatic Printing Mechanism

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000052457D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-11
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hoekstra, JP: AUTHOR

Abstract

An electrostatic printing mechanism is illustrated in Fig. 1 including a drum 1 that rotates at 30 revolutions per second. Drum 1 includes at least one spiral groove 2 therein that winds 360 degrees around drum 1. A plurality of styli 3 are mounted in close proximity to spiral 2 to permit electric charge to pass from spiral 2 onto one end of the individual styli and onto the paper (not shown) which is proximate to the other ends of the styli 3. As drum 1 rotates with appropriate timing, spiral 2 addresses each of styli 3 individually so that a dot pattern can be produced on the paper.

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Electrostatic Printing Mechanism

An electrostatic printing mechanism is illustrated in Fig. 1 including a drum 1 that rotates at 30 revolutions per second. Drum 1 includes at least one spiral groove 2 therein that winds 360 degrees around drum 1. A plurality of styli 3 are mounted in close proximity to spiral 2 to permit electric charge to pass from spiral 2 onto one end of the individual styli and onto the paper (not shown) which is proximate to the other ends of the styli 3. As drum 1 rotates with appropriate timing, spiral 2 addresses each of styli 3 individually so that a dot pattern can be produced on the paper.

Drum 1 includes a DC generator 4 at one end as an integral part and supplies power for the charging of the spiral 2 as well as power for the other internal switching circuit. The other end of drum 1 includes a commutator 5 including a plurality of light-emitting diodes. Commutator 5 transmits data from logic circuits (not shown) through the set of light-emitting diodes into switching circuits located inside drum 1.

The number of light-emitting diodes in commutator 5 is dependent on the number of spirals used on drum 1.

Fig. 2 illustrates one stationary light-emitting diode 6 structure located inside a plexiglass reflector 7 having a reflective coating 8. An associated light receiver 9 is mounted within a plexiglass disk 10 or light pipe inside drum 1. The sides of the disks 10 are treated with a reflective coating to prevent cross-talk because a plur...