Browse Prior Art Database

Indicating Errors to Deaf Operators

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000052487D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-11
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Houghton, DK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a technique for prompting deaf operators of an information processing system with a display that an error has occurred. Our technique takes advantage of an operators peripheral vision by flashing the entire display screen instead of just a small area. This way of indicating error conditions is also useful for hearing operators in a high noise environment.

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Indicating Errors to Deaf Operators

This article describes a technique for prompting deaf operators of an information processing system with a display that an error has occurred. Our technique takes advantage of an operators peripheral vision by flashing the entire display screen instead of just a small area. This way of indicating error conditions is also useful for hearing operators in a high noise environment.

The existing information processing system including a display utilizes an audio signal to indicate error conditions. A bell or buzzer is often times undesirable, particularly for a system used by one whose hearing is impaired or who is in a noisy environment. Feedback to a deaf operator or whose hearing is impaired has been provided using some light source in parallel with the audio signal. This light source was associated with the display but not part thereof and, hence, required special cost-increasing mechanical and electrical connections. Yet another solution to this problem involved displaying error messages at the same time that the audio signal is sounded. This is not entirely satisfactory since an operator is already required to respond to quite a few error messages, and additional messages create human-factor-type problems.

We have developed a solution which utilizes the entire display screen to provide feedback during the audio signal time. Our technique does not require the operator to view a particular portion of a screen.

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