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Method for Preventing Spikes in Aluminum Layers on Silicon Surfaces

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000052545D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-11
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bauer, HJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In semiconductor technology, aluminum conductors and lands are deposite on planar silicon surfaces for contacting the semiconductor devices. Under some conditions, silicon from the device surface is dissolved in the aluminum layer, or vice versa, leading to unreliable devices as a result of the spikes formed.

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Method for Preventing Spikes in Aluminum Layers on Silicon Surfaces

In semiconductor technology, aluminum conductors and lands are deposite on planar silicon surfaces for contacting the semiconductor devices. Under some conditions, silicon from the device surface is dissolved in the aluminum layer, or vice versa, leading to unreliable devices as a result of the spikes formed.

To prevent the formation of such sinter spikes, small quantities of silicon (0.5 to 1%) are generally added to the aluminum layer. For this purpose, the silicon is vapor deposited in the same vaporizer as the aluminum layer, without interrupting the vacuum. A subsequent application of silicon to the vapor- deposited aluminum after interruption of the vacuum would be useless, because the aluminum oxide prevents the silicon from dissolving in the aluminum layer.

By means of the present method, silicon is alloyed into the fully patterned aluminum metallization, thus preventing the formation of spikes. For this purpose, the aluminum oxide is initially removed in a sputter clean process by means of argon gas. Then, silicon is vapor deposited on the full device without changing the vacuum means and interrupting the vacuum. In the subsequent sintering process, the vapor-deposited silicon is sintered into the aluminum conductors. During this process, the silicon and the aluminum of the conductor amalgamate, so that the silicon disappears from the surface altogether. The residual silicon in the remai...