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Hierarchical Resource Structures

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000052566D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-11
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Harian, AM: AUTHOR

Abstract

All program functions require the use of logic and/or physical resource of the system on which they run. In order to provide the most efficient use of the system resources, it is often desirable that programs share resources. In certain circumstances, however, it is required that certain system resources be isolated to one user of the system. It is also extremely important that the resources used by a user be reclaimed by the system for eventual use by another user. The hierarchical environment structure allows control of resource sharing in environments which have a parent/child relationship and resource isolation in environments which have a peer relationship.

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Hierarchical Resource Structures

All program functions require the use of logic and/or physical resource of the system on which they run. In order to provide the most efficient use of the system resources, it is often desirable that programs share resources. In certain circumstances, however, it is required that certain system resources be isolated to one user of the system. It is also extremely important that the resources used by a user be reclaimed by the system for eventual use by another user. The hierarchical environment structure allows control of resource sharing in environments which have a parent/child relationship and resource isolation in environments which have a peer relationship.

The following example, using system storage (address space) as the resource, illustrates how a hierarchical resource structure can be used to control the isolation or sharing of a system resource.

As illustrated in the figure, environment A was allocated address space X, out of which sub-address spaces Y and Z were sub-allocated. Environments A and B share address space X', while environments C and D have isolated unique address spaces Y and Z, respectively.

All three address spaces are isolated from each other (i.e., environment C cannot use any portion of X' or Z; environment D cannot use any portion of X' or
Y), yet sharing is still possible between environments A and B.

The hierarchical resource structure can be applied to the management of any system resource in a sim...