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Splatter Shield for Aspirated Ink Jet Printers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000052582D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-11
Document File: 2 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bell, RR: AUTHOR

Abstract

During start up and shut down of ink jet printers, especially the aspirated type where air and ink flow through a tunnel such as the tunnel 10 shown in Fig. 1, ink from the ink stream nozzle 16 passing through the charge electrode 17 tends to splatter on the sidewalls of the tunnel. Because the ink is conductive, any ink disposed on the tunnel sidewall causes distortion of the electric field. This distortion occurs intermediate the deflection electrodes 11 and 12, causing print distortion. To inhibit such distortion and prevent splatter during start up and shut down, the lower deflection electrode 12 may be formed as a splatter shield, such as illustrated in Fig. 3, and include a slit or the like 13 in the direction of stream flow. A pivot 14 at one end of the splatter shield may be coupled to the body of the aspirator.

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Splatter Shield for Aspirated Ink Jet Printers

During start up and shut down of ink jet printers, especially the aspirated type where air and ink flow through a tunnel such as the tunnel 10 shown in Fig. 1, ink from the ink stream nozzle 16 passing through the charge electrode 17 tends to splatter on the sidewalls of the tunnel. Because the ink is conductive, any ink disposed on the tunnel sidewall causes distortion of the electric field. This distortion occurs intermediate the deflection electrodes 11 and 12, causing print distortion. To inhibit such distortion and prevent splatter during start up and shut down, the lower deflection electrode 12 may be formed as a splatter shield, such as illustrated in Fig. 3, and include a slit or the like 13 in the direction of stream flow. A pivot 14 at one end of the splatter shield may be coupled to the body of the aspirator.

Upon stream start up or shut down, an actuator (not shown) such as a solenoid or the like may be actuated to effect elevation of the shield 12 so that any stray ink droplets will be caught by the lower surface 12a of the shield while the conventional or normal operating stream 15 (ink drop stream) will pass through the slit 13. After start up, the shield may be lowered to the position illustrated in Fig. 1 for normal printing.

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