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Reactive Surface Layer Formation using Surface Charging

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000052643D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-11
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cuomo, JJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A surface reaction process is described wherein reactive gas ions are used for compound or oxide formation, and a low energy (less than 100 electron volts) ion beam is directed at a surface for such compound or oxide formation. The degree of charging of the surface being bombarded is controlled by external electrical means, such as capacitor or R-C networks, connected to the workpiece.

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Reactive Surface Layer Formation using Surface Charging

A surface reaction process is described wherein reactive gas ions are used for compound or oxide formation, and a low energy (less than 100 electron volts) ion beam is directed at a surface for such compound or oxide formation. The degree of charging of the surface being bombarded is controlled by external electrical means, such as capacitor or R-C networks, connected to the workpiece.

The drawing shows an ion source 1 which generates a beam of reactive gas ions 3 through extraction grid(s) 2. The ion source may be of the single-grid type.

The reactive ion beam 3 strikes the material 4 to form a surface layer of reacted material 5.

An example of material 4 is Ni metal, while surface layer 5 could be NiO, an insulator.

The energy of beam 3 must be low enough (less than about 200 eV) to allow surface reaction to take place without excessive sputtering.

Here, no neutralizer is used to add electrons to the beam. Thus, positive ions in the beam will cause the surface 5 to charge up to a positive potential. The thickness of the surface reactive layer will be determined by the time needed to charge the surface 5 up to the beam potential. This charging rate may be controlled by the following techniques: 1. Change the size of the sample holder, effectively changing its capacitance. Capacitance measures the amount of charge needed to produce a given potential. 2. Connect the sample holder to ground through a capacitor...