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Dynamic Allocation of Resident Storage Area to Avoid Storage Overcommitment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000052727D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-11
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lubart, BP: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In a non-paging system, processor storage is used more efficiently by handling the normally resident link pack area partly as permanently resident (as is conventional) and partly as dynamically resident. The dynamically resident modules of the link pack area are located in the Transient Area which is controlled by the Transient Manager. The Transient Manager keeps a table of the order of use of the storage blocks in the transient area. If additional storage space is required by user programs, transient area programs that are not being used are bumped from storage in the order of least recent use. A considerable amount of storage is made available by this technique. When the user programs require less storage, the link pack area is reloaded as the routines are called.

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Dynamic Allocation of Resident Storage Area to Avoid Storage Overcommitment

In a non-paging system, processor storage is used more efficiently by handling the normally resident link pack area partly as permanently resident (as is conventional) and partly as dynamically resident. The dynamically resident modules of the link pack area are located in the Transient Area which is controlled by the Transient Manager. The Transient Manager keeps a table of the order of use of the storage blocks in the transient area. If additional storage space is required by user programs, transient area programs that are not being used are bumped from storage in the order of least recent use. A considerable amount of storage is made available by this technique. When the user programs require less storage, the link pack area is reloaded as the routines are called.

Ordinarily a user program requires only a fraction of the storage space that it might require under particular conditions, and jobs are scheduled on the basis of the probable storage requirement rather than on the basis of the maximum storage for each program. Occasionally, the actual storage requirement of programs rises above the storage capacity of the system. This operating system feature permits the system to expand storage for the user programs by contracting the storage space that is assigned to link pack area modules.

The link pack area holds routines that are frequently called by user programs. When these routines ca...