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Solvent Recovery in Transfer Ribbon Manufacture

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000052728D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-11
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Findlay, HT: AUTHOR

Abstract

Resins cast in typewriter ribbon manufacture and the like in solutions of dichloromethane (CH(2)Cl(2)) or tetrahydrofuran (THF) are removed by immersing the cast layer directly into a low viscosity mineral oil. The process avoids removal of the solvent by evaporation, thus eliminating the concern that vapor will enter the atmosphere during evaporative extraction.

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Solvent Recovery in Transfer Ribbon Manufacture

Resins cast in typewriter ribbon manufacture and the like in solutions of dichloromethane (CH(2)Cl(2)) or tetrahydrofuran (THF) are removed by immersing the cast layer directly into a low viscosity mineral oil. The process avoids removal of the solvent by evaporation, thus eliminating the concern that vapor will enter the atmosphere during evaporative extraction.

The resins will serve as the support or substrate layer in any of the various transfer medium configurations. They may be filled when cast, such as with carbon black, or unfilled. Typical resins are polycarbonate cast in CH(2)Cl(2) and polyurethane cast in THF.

They are cast on a temporary support of polyethylene terephthalate and immediately plunged into a bath of low viscosity mineral oil. The mineral oil rapidly extracts the solvent and causes a rapid separation of the resin with any filler. Subsequent removal and recovery of the solvent from the mineral oil is easily achieved by conventional methods not involving evaporation.

The extraction liquid employed depends on the chemistry of the other materials involved. Water can be used for limited extractions or as a final stage in the type of process described.

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