Browse Prior Art Database

Strategy for Fast Interaction with a Complex Display

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000052804D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-11
Document File: 3 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bantz, DF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A technique is described for providing an immediate response on an interactive display which has a complex visual representation.

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Strategy for Fast Interaction with a Complex Display

A technique is described for providing an immediate response on an interactive display which has a complex visual representation.

In designing a sophisticated interactive display terminal there is a need for providing immediate response, as well as providing a display of complex visual representation. The purpose of providing a quick response is to confirm the user's actions in a time period commensurate with his expectations.

The strategy presented herein is to partition the display process into two or more parts. For example, one part could display the basic outline of a character, and the second part could elaborate on the display of the character by filling it in or providing seraphs. The first part would be provided rapidly so the system is responsive. The second part would be done only as ""background'' time is available to the processor.

Referring to Fig. 1, initially there will be described a software implementation of a two-part process which we will label ""foreground'' (high priority) 1 and ""background'' (low priority) 2, but it must be pointed out that such implementation can be easily extended to multiple parts of varying priorities. A display 3 is connected to a display buffer 4 and, in turn, to a character buffer 5 and keyboard 6.

Whenever human action occurs, a high priority interrupt is generated and the foreground process or task creates an immediate response on the display 3. For example, the generation of characters in a very basic font of appropriate height and width may be rapidly painted on the screen. Each character may be flagged to indicate the need for further processing.

As the foreground task is completed and it goes into a ""wait'' state, waiting for more human interaction, the background task is invoked. It may repaint each character in a different font or with seraphs. As it completes each character, the flag for that character is removed. If the background task is interrupted by the foreground task for more human interaction, it may be restarted at a logical breaking place such as repainting the entire character rather than in the middle of such a construction. This would allow for the foregr...