Browse Prior Art Database

I/O Load Balancing Using Device Connection Timings

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000052950D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-12
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McClain, GA: AUTHOR

Abstract

To achieve good utilization of all the I/O resources of a computing system, it is important to identify situations where an imbalance exists which allows some of the resources to be underutilized while others are overutilized. If these situations can be identified, then changes can be made to a current mix of jobs being executed on the systems so that these imbalances are corrected.

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I/O Load Balancing Using Device Connection Timings

To achieve good utilization of all the I/O resources of a computing system, it is important to identify situations where an imbalance exists which allows some of the resources to be underutilized while others are overutilized. If these situations can be identified, then changes can be made to a current mix of jobs being executed on the systems so that these imbalances are corrected.

An example of load balancing is found in an operating system such as the IBM MVS (Multiple Virtual Storage) program, in which the load balancing function is performed by the Systems Resources Manager (SRM) which regulates system resource usage by swapping jobs in and out of main storage. The algorithms that balance usage of the resources for the I/0 subsystems are called the I/O load balancer. Thus, SRM may measure the usage of various subsets of the I/O subsystems as well as the contributions to this usage being made by each address space. Particular address spaces which are significant users of these subsets may then be selected for execution by having their jobs swapped out in order to decrease usage on overutilized subsets, and having their jobs swapped in, in order to increase usage on underutilized subsets of the I/O subsystem.

Traditionally, channel paths over which devices transfer data to and from storage have been a critical resource, and therefore one useful way to subset the I/O subsystems is to logically group together th...