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Security for Record Containing Cassettes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000052995D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-12
Document File: 3 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cussick, EV: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Security of data on a record in a cassette is enhanced by placing a removable external optically-sensed label on the cassette with a corresponding internal label on the record itself. The recorder and host combination of using the cassette enables updating the internal label to the external label. Extent limitations on access are also indicated for facilitating recovery from errors and for providing additional security integrity checking. In order to improve security for removable record members, such as tapes, the following problems must be solved: 1. Reconciling external record label with internal record label; 2. Limiting use of a record to a certain area of the record, respective to the users;, 3. Eliminating record volume recognition for operating-system-dependent and user-dependent labelling.

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Security for Record Containing Cassettes

Security of data on a record in a cassette is enhanced by placing a removable external optically-sensed label on the cassette with a corresponding internal label on the record itself. The recorder and host combination of using the cassette enables updating the internal label to the external label. Extent limitations on access are also indicated for facilitating recovery from errors and for providing additional security integrity checking. In order to improve security for removable record members, such as tapes, the following problems must be solved: 1. Reconciling external record label with internal record label; 2. Limiting use of a record to a certain area of the record, respective to the users;, 3. Eliminating record volume recognition for operating-system-dependent and user- dependent labelling.

To solve these problems, the following has been devised. First, the recorder, such as a tape recorder, contains an optical reader capable of scanning a bar- coded label present on a cassette. This label is adhesive-backed, but is manufactured such that a user may remove or alter this label, should the external identification procedure of the data processing installation change.

Second, the recorder has the capability to read the bar-code label when a cassette is inserted, and holding that information. This data is the external label identification, and is established by the user.

Third, the recorder has the capability to read a special area at the beginning of the recorded tape within the cassette. This area on the tape has a special machine-readable pattern that either is absent, or corresponds to the bar-code label on the outside of the cassette. This area on the tape can be reinitialized to a null value by magnetically erasing the entire tape volume. This erasure must be accomplished outside of the subsystem, as the tape subsystem will never permit the recorded special area to be overwritten or erased.

Fourth, once the external label and the machine-coded information from the media has been read, the recorder compares the two items of information. If the machine-coded information was present, that internal code must match the bar- code label's informational content. Otherwise, the recorder ejects the cassette, disallowing any use of the contained information. If the external label is damaged, and the information on the tape is needed by the installation, the only way to retrieve that information is for the user to read the access table (see seventh item, below), and affix a new, correct, external label on the cartridge.

Fifth, if no machine-readable information is recorded on the cassette tape, then the recorder automatically writes device-coded information matching that of the bar-code label to the tape in the special area.

Sixth, once an equal comparison of the external and machine-written labels has been achieved, or, if the recorder copied the information from the external label to the ta...