Browse Prior Art Database

Preparation of Amorphous Hydrogenated Silicon by Chemical Vapor Deposition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000053005D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-12
Document File: 2 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Plecenik, RM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The low cost of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film devices has made this material highly attractive as a candidate for solar cell, photoconductor, and thin film transistor technologies. The most interesting form of a-Si, however, is that containing up to approximately 35 atomic % hydrogen, obtained in the plasma deposition reactions of mono- or higher silanes. In such ``amorphous hydrogenated silicon'' (a-Si:H), hydrogen eliminates dangling bond gap states, thus improving the transport properties and allowing the films to be doped n- and p-type for various potential electronic applications.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 56% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Preparation of Amorphous Hydrogenated Silicon by Chemical Vapor Deposition

The low cost of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film devices has made this material highly attractive as a candidate for solar cell, photoconductor, and thin film transistor technologies. The most interesting form of a-Si, however, is that containing up to approximately 35 atomic % hydrogen, obtained in the plasma deposition reactions of mono- or higher silanes. In such ``amorphous hydrogenated silicon'' (a-Si:H), hydrogen eliminates dangling bond gap states, thus improving the transport properties and allowing the films to be doped n- and p-type for various potential electronic applications.

For the above reasons, there is considerable interest in new methods of preparing a-Si:H having enhanced properties. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of SiH(4) has not been much utilized as a preparative technique because at the high temperatures (>/-600 degrees C) required to obtain reasonably fast deposition rates, very little hydrogen remains in the film, resulting in poor properties from the standpoint of photoelectronic behavior desired for the above applications. As a result, for CVD films prepared to date, an additional heating and plasma H(2) treatment step is required to reintroduce hydrogen into the films. This method is not completely effective, however, and the resulting films do not have the enhanced properties compared to those that have been deposited directly by the plasma decomposition o...