Browse Prior Art Database

Print Wire Actuator Tester

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000053049D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-12
Document File: 2 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Siegal, LR: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Described herein is a print wire actuator tester which permits analysis of the basic actuator parameters, such as impact force, flight time, cycle time and coil current.

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Print Wire Actuator Tester

Described herein is a print wire actuator tester which permits analysis of the basic actuator parameters, such as impact force, flight time, cycle time and coil current.

Referring to Fig. 1, the print wire actuator 10 is clamped into the test fixture
12. The stroke for which the actuator 10 is to be tested is set by the handwheel 14 and dial 16. When a current pulse is applied to the coil 18, the armature 20 and attached print wire 22 move to the right and impact the anvil 23 and flight time transducer 24, producing a signal of the impact force and the flight time. When the armature 20 returns to its initial position, an impact is transmitted to the cycle time transducer 26 giving the cycle time. The motion detector 28 converts the motion of the print wire tip into an electrical signal.

By appropriately connecting the signals through an oscilloscope, the above- noted five parameters can be recorded and, by further using a graphics terminal, the parameters can be printed out together with a graph representing the actuator performance. It should be noted that the magnitude and shape of the coil current pulse may be sensed by a current probe, not shown in Fig. 1.

During the design and manufacturing of print wire actuator 10, it is advantageous to know the motion of wire 22. To do this, a non-contacting detector scheme must be used in order not to alter the motion of the lightweight armature 20 and wire 22. An optical device, shown in Fig....