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Modified Schottky Barrier Diode Voltage

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000053097D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-12
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Curry, WJ: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Aluminum-copper alloy films for metallization to provide ohmic contacts and Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) have usually been deposited by evaporating a metal source by the use of radio frequency (RF) energy. The use of electron beam guns (E-guns) to evaporate the metal provides certain advantages. It has been determined, however, that the forward voltage of SBDs produced by evaporation of an aluminum-copper source through the use of E-guns is higher than that produced by evaporation using RF energy. The desired forward voltage (V(f)) of SBDs produced by RF evaporation is in the range of from about 550-600 mv at 1 ma. The actual V(f) of SBDs produced by the use of an E-gun is in the range of from about 650-690 mv at 1 ma.

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Modified Schottky Barrier Diode Voltage

Aluminum-copper alloy films for metallization to provide ohmic contacts and Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) have usually been deposited by evaporating a metal source by the use of radio frequency (RF) energy. The use of electron beam guns (E-guns) to evaporate the metal provides certain advantages. It has been determined, however, that the forward voltage of SBDs produced by evaporation of an aluminum-copper source through the use of E-guns is higher than that produced by evaporation using RF energy. The desired forward voltage (V(f)) of SBDs produced by RF evaporation is in the range of from about 550-600 mv at 1 ma. The actual V(f) of SBDs produced by the use of an E-gun is in the range of from about 650-690 mv at 1 ma.

It has been determined that the V(F) of Schottky barrier diodes produced by metal evaporation using E-guns can be modified to a desirable lower range by applying a positive voltage bias to the wafer substrates during metal deposition.

A series of experiments were conducted in which wafers were electrically biased during the aluminum-copper deposition cycle using E-gun evaporation. The table below shows the results of these experiments which clearly demonstrate that the use of positive voltage bias of the wafers during metal deposition using E-gun evaporation results in reducing the V(f) at 1 ma.

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