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Dielectic Layers for Gas Panel Displays and Method for Depositing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000053100D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-12
Document File: 2 page(s) / 14K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Leuung, GB: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Gaseous discharge display panels consist of a pair of glass plates having conductor arrays formed thereon which are overcoated with a dielectric layer. By forming two of the plates with conductor arrays substantially orthogonal to each other, displays can be provided by selective energization of the associated conductors, with each of the conductor intersections defining a gaseous discharge display cell. A matrix of such cells can be used to define alphanumeric characters.

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Dielectic Layers for Gas Panel Displays and Method for Depositing

Gaseous discharge display panels consist of a pair of glass plates having conductor arrays formed thereon which are overcoated with a dielectric layer. By forming two of the plates with conductor arrays substantially orthogonal to each other, displays can be provided by selective energization of the associated conductors, with each of the conductor intersections defining a gaseous discharge display cell. A matrix of such cells can be used to define alphanumeric characters.

Conventionally, high lead oxide glass is used for the dielectric layer in AC discharge panels. The dielectric layer is deposited on glass substrates in the form of a slurry which is sprayed or screened onto the panel and then heated through a high temperature reflow cycle to provide a substantially uniform dielectric layer, The steps necessary for the preparation and deposition of lead glass include raw chemicals, mixing, smelting, fritting, milling, slurry formation, spraying or silk screening, drying, binder burnout and reflow. The capital investment required for turning out this process is quite high, and energy consumption is also great. Reflowed dielectric film from this process often exhibits many surface defects, including morphological asperities, fine bubbles or seeds, and occasionally metal corrosion which will lower the production yield. In addition, because of its relatively low softening point, the lead glass dielectric can disturb the usual overlay MgO coating, causing crazing or flaking.

In this process the dielectric layer is deposited by a reactive sputtering using various alloys as target materials and O(2) and N(2)O as reactive gas. Numerous dielectric films can be formed and deposited by reactive sputtering, which films need not include lead. For example, aluminum magnesium silicate dielectric can be deposited with a target of an alloy containing 48% aluminum, 28% magnesium and 24% silicon The film is reactively sputtered under a system pressure of 2 x 10 torr with a 1-micron argon and 0.5-micron 0 pressures at a power input of 2 kw or higher i...